Servicing, Service Annually, dont miss out on the dive, the dive shack, snorkel safari, adelaide, scuba, diving, snorkelling, spearfishing, freediving

Equipment Servicing

The equipment we use as SCUBA divers is life support equipment! Therefore, proper maintenance and servicing of our equipment is very vital. Not only will the equipment be safer to use when it is regularly serviced, it will also last longer and maintain a better value.

The materials that make up dive equipment are subject to oxidation and decay. Salt, dust and dirt can be particularly harmful to your equipment, but heat, ultraviolet light, ozone and fumes have a bad influence on it as well. Divers should therefore use good judgement in the protection of their gear from all these substances.

A lot of the maintenance of your equipment is in your own hands. However, you should keep in mind that it is recommended to have your equipment serviced at least once a year and don’t forget to have your SCUBA tanks hydrostatically tested anually (as required by Australian Standards). See our servicing price list for more details on equipment servicing.

The following sections provide you with useful information about keeping scuba equipment in good shape:

BCDs

After you’ve been diving, soak and rinse your BCD in fresh water. On almost every dive, water will have entered the BCD, so it’s always a good idea to rinse the BCD’s inside air bladder as well. To do so, press and hold the oral inflator button and fill the bladder one third full of water. Rotate the BCD a couple of times to allow the water to move around inside the bladder. Drain the water completely by turning the BCD upside down while pressing the oral inflator button and store the BCD partially inflated.

Have the BCD serviced according to manufacturer’s suggestions, usually once a year.

Dive Computers

Computers and diving instruments are very sensitive to water, salt, dust and dirt. After you’ve been diving, soak them in fresh water as soon as possible while working all moving parts to loosen salt and dirt deposits.

Have your dive computer or instruments serviced according to manufacturer’s recommendations, usually once a year, to ensure the longetivity of delicate and expensive instruments. Follow all manufacturer’s recommendations and always read the servicing manual before attempting to replace the batteries.

Fins

After you’ve been diving, soak and rinse in fresh water. Loosen and tighten the straps a couple of times while rinsing to loosen salt and dirt deposits. To prevent the foot pockets from losing shape, stuff the foot pocket with an insert after rinsing.

Store fins either lying flat or hanging – if you lean them against a wall they will bend over time. Avoid leaving them in hot places like cars because they can soften and bend.

Lights and Cameras

Lights and cameras are very sensitive to water, salt, dust and dirt. Clean thorougly and lubricate all o-rings with silicone grease before every use. Be careful to use the correct type of grease, as some o-rings are made using a material that can degrade when using the normal grease! Always read your manual to check these details.

After you’ve been diving, soak them in fresh water as soon as possible while working all moving parts (especially buttons) to loosen any salt and dirt deposits. Once dry, loosen all connectors so they do not freeze in place, then remove batteries and memory cards. Store the camera and the light(s) in protective cases to prevent any seals from exposure to dust and dirt. Store the o-rings inside the housing when not in use and keep the case closed to help them keep their shape and keep dust out. Cheaper housings with metal springs behind the buttons can benefit from a spray with silicon every few uses to reduce the incidence of rust damage.

Have your camera serviced and pressure tested according to manufacturer’s recommendations, usually once a year, to ensure the longetivity of delicate and expensive instruments. Follow all manufacturer’s recommendation.

Masks

After you’ve been diving, soak and rinse your mask in fresh water. Loosen and tighten the straps a couple of times while rinsing to loosen salt and dirt deposits. Store the mask in its original box.

Give new mask lenses a good clean with toothpaste or preferably McNett Seabuff to remove the layer of grease on the inside of the lens that causes fogging. Repeat every 5-10 dives and when sunscreen gets smeared everywhere. Seabuff with also help clean with the silicone skirt of the mask when it starts to look a bit dirty.

Regulators

After you’ve been diving, soak your regulators in clean fresh water (no additives), if possible for about an hour. Work all moving parts to loosen any particles that may have accumulated inside the regulators. While the regulators are submerged, it is very important to prevent water from entering the first stage. The best way to prevent this, is leaving the regulator connected to a pressurized tank and press the purge button on the second stage a couple of times before taking the regulators out of the water. The second-best option is to blow or towel dry the dust cap and put it in place on the first stage. Do not press the purge button on the second stage when using this method.

When you’ve soaked and rinsed the regulators, dry them with a clean towel and store them in a cool dry place, away from dust, light, heat and fumes (for example: a plastic bag). Store the regulators in a position where there is little or no stress on the hoses, and the second stage below the first with mouthpiece facing down.

Have your regulators serviced according to manufacturer’s recommendations, usually once a year.

Tanks

After you’ve been diving, rinse your scuba cylinder(s) in fresh water and wipe them dry. Remove the tank boot and dry the cylinder completely so that no water is allowed to accumulate on the outside of the tank. Open the valve briefly to expel any moisture from the valve opening.

All SCUBA cylinders should be inspected regularly. Before diving, check for any corrosion or heavy wear on the outside of the tank. Have your cylinder visually inspected at least once a year and more frequently if you use it heavily, have it filled in a humid environment or if the tank is drained completely.

In South Australia, tanks must be hydrostatically tested anually to ensure the integrity of the tank walls. Be sure tanks are pressurized to at least 10 BAR to prevent any moisture from entering the cylinder. Store tanks securely and upright in a cool dry place.

Weights

After you’ve been diving, rinse your weights in fresh water.

Wetsuit, Booties and Gloves

After you’ve been diving, soak and rinse all neoprene or similar materials thoroughly with fresh water that contains a wetsuit conditioner. Ordinary detergents cause the neoprene to deteriorate faster while the condition really helps to maintain the stretch and flexibility of the material. While soaking, flex the material with a kneading motion to remove any particles from the material. McNett Mirazyme is also available that will help to control odors – especially necessary when you are diving frequently. Apply a light coating of beeswax to zippers when dry, then work them back and forth to prevent sticking.

Allow wetsuits, booties and gloves to drip dry on appropriate hangers that prevent creasing of the neoprene.